Child discipline is the methods positive parenting techniques pdf to prevent future behavioral problems in children. The word discipline is defined as imparting knowledge and skill, in other words, to teach. In its most general sense, discipline refers to systematic instruction given to a disciple.


To discipline means to instruct a person to follow a particular code of conduct. Discipline is used by parents to teach their children about expectations, guidelines and principles. Children need to be given regular discipline to be taught right from wrong and to be maintained safe.

Child discipline can involve rewards and punishments to teach self-control, increase desirable behaviors and decrease undesirable behaviors. Because the values, beliefs, education, customs and cultures of people vary so widely, along with the age and temperament of the child, methods of child discipline vary widely. Child discipline is a topic that draws from a wide range of interested fields, such as parenting, the professional practice of behavior analysis, developmental psychology, social work, and various religious perspectives.

In recent years, advances in the understanding of attachment parenting have provided a new background of theoretical understanding and advanced clinical and practical understanding of the effectiveness and outcome of parenting methods. In Western society, there has been debate in recent years over the use of corporal punishment for children in general, and increased attention to the concept of “positive parenting” where good behavior is encouraged and rewarded. Historical research suggests that there has been a great deal of individual variation in methods of discipline over time. Nicholas Orme of the University of Exeter argues that children in medieval times were treated differently from adults in legal matters, and the authorities were as troubled about violence to children as they were to adults.

In his article, “Childhood in Medieval England,” he states, “Corporal punishment was in use throughout society and probably also in homes, although social commentators criticized parents for indulgence towards children rather than for harsh discipline. Salvation was the main goal of discipline, and parents were driven to ensure their children a place in heaven. In one incident in early 14th-century London, neighbors intervened when a cook and clerk were beating a boy carrying water. A scuffle ensued and the child’s tormentors were subdued.

The neighbors didn’t even know the boy, but they firmly stood up for him even when they were physically attacked, and they stood by their actions when the cook and clerk later sued for damages. During colonial times in the United States, parents were able to provide enjoyments for their children in the form of toys, according to David Robinson, writer for the Colonial Williamsburg Journal.

Robinson notes that even the Puritans permitted their young children to play freely. Older children were expected to swiftly adopt adult chores and accountabilities, to meet the strict necessities of daily life.

Harsh punishments for minor infractions were common. The Book of Proverbs mentions the importance of disciplining children, as opposed to leaving them neglected or unruly, in several verses. Interpretation of these verses varies, as do many passages from the Bible, from literal to metaphorical.

The most often paraphrased is from Proverbs 13:24, “He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes. Other passages that mention the ‘rod’ are Proverbs 23:14, “Thou shalt beat him with the rod, and shalt deliver his soul from hell,” and Proverbs 29:15, “The rod and reproof give wisdom: but a child left to himself bringeth his mother to shame.